Misery Signals to Release Documentary, "Yesterday Was Everything" on June 30th

Over the last decade influential hardcore band Misery Signals has undergone overwhelming changes involving the departure of their founding singer and infighting that nearly left the band in complete shambles.  In a new documentary, directed by Matthew Mixon, titled “Yesterday Was Everything,” the band takes viewers on an intimate journey of reconciliation as they find healing in the present by confronting the demons of their past. The documentary will be available on June 30th at iTunes, Google Play and Amazon. The band will be doing an in-theater screening of the documentary in Edmonton, AB on June 20th (7:00pm at Metro Cinema at the Garneau, 8712 109th Street, Edmonton AB) with partial proceeds being donated to Mothers Against Drunk Driving.

Filmed during Misery Signals 2014 tour in celebration of the 10th anniversary of their coveted album, Of Malice and the Magnum Heart, “Yesterday Was Everything” follows the band as they reunite with their former vocalist for the first time since his unceremonious ousting a decade prior.  The film explores the fatal tragedy that brought the band together and follows their journey from Vancouver to Toronto as they face old ghosts and attempt to reconcile the past.

"Yesterday Was Everything provides a glimpse into a very tumultuous period in our development as young men, friends and musicians. Without the ups and downs of those formative years it's hard to say where we'd all be today. I believe this film offers fans of the band intimate information to questions that have otherwise gone unanswered. It allows insight into the story of Compromise; a tragedy that forever changed the trajectory of our lives." - Stuart Ross (Guitar)

"Matthew Mixon does a fantastic job of portraying the intensity that lies within the story. The good alongside the bad, the uncomfortable moments, the love shared between the five of us that extends to all the friends and fans we have made over the last decade, and the ability to come out of it still being able to call each other friends. I can't wait for the world to experience it." - Kyle Johnson (Bass)

"Mixon's film plays like a love letter to the independent music experience. You get a seat right there in the tour van as we grapple with the challenges of the road and attempt to create authentic music together. For those outside of the band's audience “YWE” allows an inside look at a scene they might be unaware of. It strikes me that my bandmates and the others in the film bear little resemblance to the "metalhead" archetype.  And you do get an intimate look at us, as scary as that is, you get 3 dimensions that include our failings and flaws. But that's what I think sets the film apart from other music documentaries I've seen. There's a vulnerability that anyone can relate to, and I think everyone walks away with a better understanding. Especially us." - Ryan Morgan (guitar)